Lincolnshire Places

 

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Alford,
Mill
This is one of the finest windmills in Lincolnshire.   It has six storeys and was built in 1813.   It is in working order. thumbnail picture
Boothby Pagnell,
Manor House
In the grounds of the Hall is the most important Norman manor house in England.   It was built circa 1200 with a moat. thumbnail picture
Brocklesby,
Mausoleum
This mausoleum commemorates Sophia Aufrere who died in 1786. thumbnail picture
Coleby, 
Temple
 Less well known is the Temple of Romulus and Remus which was built in 1792. thumbnail picture
Coleby,
Hall
The gateway to Coleby Hall is an imitation ruined Roman arch based upon Newport Arch in Lincoln. thumbnail picture
Crowland,
Bridge
This three-arched triangular bridge was built across the three streams at the junction of the Nene and Welland rivers. thumbnail picture
Doddington,
Hall
This late Elizabethan house is something of a surprise in this part of England.   There have been few changes made to it since it was first built. thumbnail picture
Dunston,
Pillar
This land lighthouse was built in 1751 but the lantern was replaced in 1810 by a statue of George III.   This was removed in 1939 and the pillar shortened by the R.A.F. thumbnail picture
Epworth,
Rectory
This house, which was the childhood home of the Wesley brothers, was rebuilt after a fire in 1709. thumbnail picture
Fillingham,
Castle
This curiosity is a late 18th century house. thumbnail picture
Folkingham The former House of Correction was built on the ruins of the bailey of the Castle in 1835. thumbnail picture
Fydell House,
Boston
This is the grandest house in Boston and was rebuilt in 1726. thumbnail picture
Gainsborough,
Old Hall
Most of this house was built of brick in the mid 14th century. thumbnail picture
Grantham,
Angel & Royal Hotel
This is one of the grandest pre-Reformation inns in England With a late 14th century fašade. thumbnail picture
Grimsby,
Dock Tower
This is one of the most memorable buildings in Grimsby and can be seen for many miles.   It was built as part of the hydraulic system to open the lock gates and operate the cranes. thumbnail picture
Grimsthorpe,
Castle
In 1541 the original building was enlarged by the Duke of Suffolk in preparation for a visit by Henry VIII.   The west front was rebuilt in the early 18th century. thumbnail picture
Gunby
Hall
This house, which was built in 1700, is supposed to be Tennyson's 'haunt of ancient peace'. thumbnail picture
Harlaxton,
Manor

This remarkable house was built in the 1830s by Gregory Gregory on the site of an early 17th century house.

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Heckington,
Mill
This working mill with eight sails was built in 1830. thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
High Bridge
The medieval chapel on the east side of the bridge was demolished in 1762 but on the west side there are still 16th century timber framed shops and houses. thumbnail picture
Lincoln
Imp
Soon after the Angel Choir of Lincoln Cathedral was completed the devil sent two imps to annoy the Dean.   The Angels tried to get the imps to behave and one was persuaded to leave.  The other insisted on making a nuisance of himself and, when all else failed, the angels took the opportunity, when he was resting high up on one of the pillars, to turn him to stone.  And there he can still be seen! thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
Jews House
This two storied stone building dates from the late 12th century. thumbnail picture
Langton-by-Spilsby This is one of my favourite Lincolnshire villages.  The Georgian church is illustrated on the 'Churches' pages.  The round, thatched house is most unusual. thumbnail picture
North Somercotes,
Locksley Hall
This apparently Elizabethan House is in fact Georgian with genuine reclaimed Tudor casing. thumbnail picture
Louth,
Market Hall
The tall thin clock tower was built in the late 19th century. thumbnail picture
Mavis Enderby This cartoon drawn by Harold Addison shows two urchins adding the words 'the gift of a son' to the signpost to Mavis Enderby and Old Bolingbroke.    There are some remarkable place names in Lincolnshire and Yellow Bellies do have a sense of humour!! thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
Newport Arch
This is the only Roman gateway in Britain which is still used by traffic. thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
Pottergate
This is one of the two original gateways to the Close and was built in the 14th century. thumbnail picture
Raithby
Chapel
This chapel is an upper room above the stables of the hall.  It was completed in 1779 and dedicated by John Wesley. thumbnail picture
Scrivelsby
Court
The Lion Gate is at the entrance to the park and is surmounted by a stone lion. The court is the home of the Dymoke family who are hereditary Champions to the Sovereign. thumbnail picture
Somersby,
Grange
This embattled house was built in 1722. thumbnail picture
Stamford Browne's Hospital is one of many interesting stone buildings in this town.  It was built in 1476 to provide accommodation for ten poor men and two women. thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
Stonebow
There has been a gateway here since the Roman period and the chamber above has been used by the city council since the 13th century.  The present building was begun in the late 15th century. thumbnail picture
Tattershall,
Castle
The 110 ft. high keep was built in the mid 15th century of brick. thumbnail picture
Sibsey
Trader Mill
Sibsey Trader Mill was built in 1877 to replace a small post mill.  It is one of the few six sailed mills remaining in England. thumbnail picture
Thornton Abbey,
Gateway
This imposing edifice built in the 14th century is the largest of all English gateways.  It is approached by a 120 ft long red-brick barbican. thumbnail picture
Tom Thumb In Tattershall church there is a gravestone inscribed T. Thumb aged 101 Died 1620.  There is a small house on the roof of a residence in Tattershall which is known as Tom Thumb's House.  There is another small house on a roof in Horncastle and both probably date from the 16th century. thumbnail picture
Lincoln,
Usher Gallery
Built in 1926 contains a remarkable collection of watches and a considerable collection of paintings by Peter de Wint. thumbnail picture
Wainfleet
All Saints
Wainfleet School was founded in 1484 by Bishop Waynfleet. thumbnail picture
Woodhall

The tower on the moor (left) was built in the 14th century and is part of a hunting lodge.  The Wellington Monument (right) was erected in 1844 to mark the planting of a wood to commemorate the battle of Waterloo.

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Woolsthorpe,
Manor
This house was built in the 17th century and is famous as the birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton. thumbnail picture

Last updated: 18/11/2011